Thursday, March 23, 2017

Confederate Earthenworks #history #genealogy #northcarolinapioneers

Confederate Earthenworks 

Fort Fisher

Fort Fisher near Wilmington possessed one of the largest Confederate earthenworks forts, with Colonel William Lamb as its commander. In fact, it was Lamb who redesigned the fort similar to the Russian Crimean War fort called Malakoff Tower. It was heavily armed and its earth and sand mound construction readily absorbed bombardment by heavy artillery. In December of 1864, the Union Navy blew up a ship packed with explosive in front of the fort, with slight damage to the fort itself. Determined to close the port of Wilmington to Confederate blockade runners, General Grant ordered a second attack in January of 1865. During Jnuary of 1865 Confederate defenders repelled one part of the Union attack on Fort Fisher. However, when Federal units penetracted the defenses of the fort in another sector, they captured the fort. The fall of Fort Fisher closed the part of Wilmington, which was the last fort open to the Confederacy.

Find your Ancestors Records on North Carolina Pioneers

SUBSCRIBE HERE
Memberships has its benefits
Become a Member Click on Bundle and Save



Click on Subscribe

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Images of Granville Co. NC Wills & Estates #genealogy #northcarolinapioneers

Granville County Wills and Estates


Granville MapGranville County was form in 1746 from Edgecombe County and was named after John Carteret, the second Earl Granville, an heir to one of the eight original Lord Proprietors of the Province of North Carolina claimed in the charter of 1665. In 1752 parts of Granville County, Bladen County, and Johnston County were combined to form Orange County. In 1764 the eastern part of Granville County became Bute County. Finally, in 1881 parts of Granville County, Franklin County, and Warren County were combined to form Vance County.

Granville County Wills and other Records Available to Members ofNorth Carolina Pioneers 

Miscellaneous Wills
  • Abstracts of Granville County Wills 1707 to 1760
Digital Images of Loose (unrecorded) Wills 1749 to 1771

Testators: Anderson, George | Arendell, Richard | Bell, Thomas | Benson, Thomas | Bledsoe, Abraham | Bradford, Richard | Bridger, William | Bullock, David | Cooper, Benjamin | Daniel, John | Draughton, Robert | Elwick, Darwin | Fowler, Richard | Goodloe, John | Griggs, Minor | Hargrave, Richard | Harris, Sherwood | Hicks, Absalom | Hightower, Joshua | Holmes, Frederick | Howard, Alexander | Hunt, Henry | Jones, Edward | Jordan, George Sr. | Jordin, Sarah | Langston, Solomon | Linsey, Dennis | McMillan, Alexander | Mershaw, John | Miers, Mathias | Mitchell, Robert | Moore, William | Moss, William | Olliver, William | Parlic, Benjamin | Patterson, Francis | Person, Mary | Phipps, Isaiah | Priddey, Robert | Priddy, Robert | Rieves, William | Robeson, George | Rose, William | Shearon, Joseph | Smith, John | Spivey, Littleton | Taylor, Philip | Veazey, Edward | Wallace, John | White, Richard Sr. | Williams, Daniel | Williams, Thomas | Wilson, Ebenezer | Winston, Isaac | Wood, John | Wright, Joseph 

Find your Ancestors Records on North Carolina Pioneers

SUBSCRIBE HERE
Memberships has its benefits
Become a Member Click on Bundle and Save



Click on Subscribe

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Davidson Co. NC Genealogy #northcarolinapioneers

Davidson County Genealogy Records


Davidson County

The current North Carolina county of Davidson was formed in 1822 from Rowan County. It was named after Brigadier General William Lee Davidson, an American Revolutionary War general killed at the Battle of Cowan's Ford on the Catawba River in 1781.

Note: The original Davidson County was created in 1786 and was located in the far western portion of North Carolina. The county seat was Nashville and included a territory covering most of what is now Middle Tennessee. When Tennessee was established as a separate state in 1796, this county became Davidson County, Tennessee.

Records Available to Members
  • Cashat, John LWT
  • List of Wills 1810 to 1970

Find your Ancestors Records on North Carolina Pioneers

SUBSCRIBE HERE
Memberships has its benefits
Become a Member Click on Bundle and Save



Click on Subscribe

Monday, March 20, 2017

About the New Garden Meeting of Quakers #history #northcarolinapioneers #genealogy

Quaker Life in New Garden

New Garden Boarding SchoolShadrick Standley Jr. was born in the rural setting of a quaker community called New Garden. The area is now known as Guilford College, about six miles west of Greensboro. The name came from the New Garden Meeting in Chester County, Pennsylvania which was taken from New Garden in County Carlow, Ireland. The quakers moved about the country, the first land was in Maryland, and from there they went into Virginia, North Carolina and even Georgia. His father has brought the famiy from the Cedar Creek Quaker community of Hanover County, Virginia. Researchers of the Quaker records should refer to Encyclopedia of Quaker Genealogy by Hinshaw for births, deaths, marriages and other details. 

Find your Ancestors Records on North Carolina Pioneers

SUBSCRIBE HERE
Memberships has its benefits
Become a Member Click on Bundle and Save



Click on Subscribe

Monday, March 13, 2017

Hillsboro NC in 1768 #history #genealogy #northcarolinapioneers

Town of Hillsboro in 1768

Hillsboro, North CarolinaSauthier's Plan of Hillsboro, 1768. The majority of the buildings shown on the maps have disappeared, however the town is depicted as it was in 1768. The Sauthier map dated October 1768 was made after the spring uprising of the Regulators in that town and immediately following the arrival of Governor Tryon in September. From this it may be suspected that (in commissioning the map) Governor Tryon had military maneuvers in mind. The little town is shown on the Eno River in the wooded land of Orange County. The big star at upper left shows north, south, east, and west, and one notes that the town seems to be laid out "properly" on these directions. Roads leading to neighboring towns are carefully marked. There are the Roads from Salisbury to Virginia; to Halifax; to New Bern; to the Quaker Settlement; and to Cross Creek. Observing the layout of the land roads, the genealogist may imagine the routes taken by his ancestors. At lower left is Oakaneetche Mountain, which was a great hump of earth overlooking Hillsboro. Another of the Occoneechee mountains is seen at the edge of the map. The Occoneechee Indians were one of several Indian tribes in the area. Later on, boy scouts in this part of Orange County belonged to the Occoneechee Council and had camporees at the Hillsboro race ground, not far from the "Race Ground" marked on our map. This Race Ground lies neatly within a bend in the Eno River, as though the river wanted to mark out this area of flat land for such special use and farms were scattered outside of the town. The rectangular plots of farm land are clearly marked, and the farm houses and secondary buildings are placed at corners convenient to the road. 

Find your Ancestors Records on North Carolina Pioneers

SUBSCRIBE HERE
Memberships has its benefits
Become a Member Click on Bundle and Save



Click on Subscribe

Sunday, March 12, 2017

Battle of Hart's Mill #history #genealogy #northcarolinapioneers

The Battle of Hart's Mill 

Battle of Harts MillDuring February of 1781, Cornwallis was chasing the retreat of General Nathanael Greene and his Continental Army to the Dan River. But Greene split off a small division of men to distract the British forces while the Continental army retreated. Thus, when Lord Cornwallis reached the river, the patriots had already crossed. With no ferries available and the Dan too deep to wade, Cornwallis and his army retreated to Hillsborough. On February 17th, Captain Joseph Graham with twenty North Carolina Cavalry and Captain Richard Simmons with twenty Mounted North Carolina Militia, both acting under General Pickens, attacked and set an ambush for a British lieutenant, sergeant, twenty four privates and two loyalists at Harts Mill on Stoney Creek three miles West of Hillsborough. The British, states Graham, lost nine killed and wounded, while the remainder were taken prisoners. 

Find your Ancestors Records on North Carolina Pioneers

SUBSCRIBE HERE
Memberships has its benefits
Become a Member Click on Bundle and Save



Click on Subscribe

Saturday, March 11, 2017

Need Help with Land Descriptions? #genealogy #northcarolinapioneers

Land Descriptions are Sometimes Tricky

Tradition has it that Joab Brooks Sr. came from England with his parents to America. He received a land grant in Cumberland County in 1756 and removed soon thereafter to Orange County where he was granted 375 acres on the waters of Ephraim's Creek. So, where is Ephraim's Creek? There was an Ephraim Sizemore in Orange County in 1757 who resided on Tick Creek. The only way to resolve such matters is to compare it with other records, such as tax digests, and other deeds which Brooks may have witnessed. The reason is descriptions do include names of neighbors and adjoining properties, creeks, rivers, timber lands. 

Tick Creek


Find your Ancestors Records on North Carolina Pioneers

SUBSCRIBE HERE
Memberships has its benefits
Become a Member Click on Bundle and Save



Click on Subscribe