Monday, August 14, 2017

Wayne Co. NC Genealogies and Histories #northcarolinapioneers

Wayne County Genealogy Records



Wayne County Court HouseWayne County was established on November 2, 1779 from the western part of Dobbs County. It was named for "Mad Anthony" Wayne, a general in the American Revolutionary War. The first court was held in the home of Josiah Sasser during which occasion the justices were to decide on a place for all subsequent courts until a courthouse could be erected. By 1782 the commissioners were named. In 1787 an act was passed establishing Waynesborough on the west side of the Neuse River on the land of Doctor Andrew Bass where the courthouse now stands. In 1855 parts of Wayne County, Edgecombe County, Johnston County, and Nash County were combined to form Wilson County. The county seat is Goldsboro, North Carolina.

Genealogy Records Available to Members
  • Miscellaneous Records at North Carolina State Archives 1788 to 1936
  • List of Estates 1930 to 1968

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Monday, August 7, 2017

Washington Co. NC Genealogies and Histories #northcarolinapioneers


Washington County Genealogy Records



Farm in Washington CountyWashington County was formed in 1799 from the western third of Tyrrell County. It was named for George Washington. County seat is Plymouth, North Carolina.

Records Available to Members
  • List of Miscellaneous Records at North Carolina State Archives 1867 to 1933
  • List of Guardians 1870 to 1941
  • List of Estates 1869 to 1959
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Tuesday, August 1, 2017

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Monday, July 31, 2017

Warren Co. NC Genealogies and Histories #northcarolinapioneers

Warren County Indexes to Deed Records


Bobbitt Home

The Bobbitt Home was originally the home of carriage maker William Bobbitt, it was later the home of Victoria Louise Pendleton, an educator and then of her daughter, Katherine Pendleton Arrington. From 1926 to 1955, Mrs. Arrington was president of the North Carolina Art Society.

Warren county was formed in 1779 from the northern half of Bute County and was named after Joseph Warren of Massachusetts who was a General and physician who was killed at the Battle of Bunker Hill during the Revolutionary War. In 1881, parts of Warren, Franklin and Granville Counties were combined to form Vance County. The county seat is Warrenton.

Indexes to Deeds
  • 1789 to 1791
  • 1791 to 1794
  • 1794 to 1796
  • 1796 to 1798
  • 1804 to 1809
  • 1807 to 1810

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Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Images of Rockingham County NC Wills and Estates #genealogy #northcarolinapioneers

Rockingham County Wills and Estates


Richardson House, Reidsville

Rockingham county was created in 1785 from Guilford County. It was named for Charles Watson-Wentworth, 2nd Marquess of Rockingham, British Prime Minister from 1765 to 1766 and again in 1782. During the War Between the States the Searcy and Moore Gun Factory, which was located at Hogans Creek, a small village northwest of Greensboro, supplied weapons to the Confederacy. These rifles were known as the North Carolina Rifles The county seat is Wentworth.

Images of Rockingham County Wills 1804 to 1829 available to members of North Carolina Pioneers 
Actor, Andrew |Adams, George |Aldridge, John |Allen, Pattrice |Allen, Valentine |Anderson, John |Andrew, George |Armstrong, John |Atkinson, John |Averton, Ann |Bailey, Abner |Barber, William |Bateman, James |Bates, Samuel |Bethell, William |Betton, James |Black, Elizabeth |Boak, John |Boak, Robert |Boyd, Andrew |Brasher, Asa |Brasher, Jemima |Broades, Michael |Brown, Alexander |Burk, John |Calland, Booker |Carter, Daniel |Chadwell, William |Charters, Charles |Claybrook, Josiah |Coffey, Michael |Conner, Thomas |Covington, John |Cubbins, John |Cunningham, John |Davidson, John |Deatherage, Bird |Denny, Walter |Diamond, Margret |Dilworth, Benjamin |Dilworth, George |Dillworth, John |Dodson, Alsey |Doherty, Samuel |Ellington, Daniel |Fielder, Samuel |Grant, Asa |Griffith, Joseph |Griffith, Zadoc |Guerin, Nathan |Harden, Peter |Hardin, Thomas |Harris, Daniel |Harrison, William |Heather, William |Henderson, Richard |Henderson, Thomas |Hermon, Henry |Herron, John |Herron, Stephen |Hodges, Charles |Hopper, Joseph |Hunter, James |Jarrell, Joshua |Johns, Ezekiel |Johnson, Gideon |Johnson, Gideon Sr. |Johnston, John |Jones, William |King, Lery |King, Thomas |King, Thomas |Kingston, Richard |Lanier, Sampson |Larkin, Thomas |Leachman, John |Leak, Francis |Lee, John Willeby |Lee, Willoughby |Lemons, Joseph |Lillard, Moses |Linch, Hugh |Little, John |Long, Prisse |Lowe, Isaac |Luitz, Adam |Lynn, Jackson |Martin, Alexander |Martin, Andrew |Martin, David |Martin, Isabel |Martin, Robert |Martin, Walter |Massey, Thomas |McClain, Joseph |McKey, John |Means, Robert |Menzies, John |Mills, Sarah |Missarp, William |Moore, Barnett |Moore, Charles |Moore, John |Moore, Samuel |Moore, Sarah |Moore, Thomas |Mullins, Thomas |Murphey, Miles |Nelson, Agnes |Nickels, John |North, Thomas |Patterson, Turner |Patrick, Mary |Perkins, Constant |Powell, Edward |Pratt, Agnes |Ray, James |Read, John |Reagan, John |Rice, Rebecah |Richardson, Edward |Roberts, Chastain |Roberts, Mary |Roberts, Nancy |Roberts, Thomas |Robertson, Mark |Rose, Thomas |Saunders, Susannah |Scales, Henry |Scales, Mary |Scales, Nathaniel |Scales, Pleasant |Scales, Thomas |Sharp, Henry |Short, Moses |Short, William |Smith, Drury |Smith, Gordon |Smith, Mary |Stamps, Joseph |Strong, John Sr. |Stubblefield, Carter |Stubblefield, Hugh |Tatum, Peter |Thomas, John |Thomas, Michael |Tomlin, Elizabeth |Tucker, Daniel |Van Landingham, Richard |Wafford, John |Wafford, John |Walker, John |Walker, John |Walker, Mary |Wall, Zachariah |Wardlow, Patrick |Watkins, Archibald |Whitsett, John |Whitworth, John |Williams, Mary |Woodward, Samuel |Wordlor, Patrick

Miscellaneous Wills
  • Lowe, Isaac, transcript of LWT (1806)

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North Carolina Genealogy Databases

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Tuesday, July 25, 2017

A Soldier from Rockingham County NC was in the Battle of Camden #northcarolinapioneers #genealogy

Soldier from Rockingham in the Battle of Camden
By Jeannette Holland Austin Jeannette Holland AustinProfile

The Battle of Camden is remembered in history as a major victory for the British. The day of the battle, August 16, 1780, the British forces commanded by Lieutenant General Charles and Lord Cornwallis routed the American forces of Major General Horatio Gates about five miles North of Camden, South Carolina and in the process strengthened the British hold over the Carolinas. Some thought that the battle was ill planned by the American General Horatio Gates. Nonetheless, it was so bad a defeat for the American forces that Gates never commanded another field battle. Peter Crawford of Rockingham County first entered the war in Mecklenburg County, Virginia during 1781 and joined the 4th Virginia regiment under the command of General Gates. They marched first to Ramseys Mill where they had a scrimmage with the Tories. They arrived in Camden on August 15, 1780, the evening before the battle. Before Crawford reached Camden he was detailed to take charge of one of the Baggage wagons for the battle. After this battle he rallied and joined the remnant of his Regiment on the Pee Dee river and marched to Hillsborough where he was discharged after a tour of Service of more than five months. The second time that he entered the service it was in the draft of Capt. Thomas Foulk and joined the regiment of Gloucester at an old field near Yorktown. Crawford remained in service until the surrender of Lord Cornwallis. 

Battle of Camden


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A Trail of Tears in North Carolina #northcarolinapioneers #genealogy

A Trail of Tears: Fort Butler near Murphy,North Carolina

Map of Cherokee RemovalFort Butler, originally named Camp Huntington, was located on a hill overlooking the Hiawassee River and was used as the headquarters of the U. S. Army charged with overseeing the affairs of the Cherokee Nation. During the Trail of Tears, it was this military deployment which forced the Cherokees further West. From here, the Cherokees were marched to Fort Cass and then into Indian Territory. After the Treaty of New Echota, during July of 1836 a force of Tennessee volunteer militia under the command of John E. Wool were sent from Tennessee. One month later the camp was abandoned, to be reoccupied about a year later and renamed Fort Butler. Its strategic location over the Hiawassee River led to the towns of the tribes which were located in the valleys. By 1838, after the deadline had passed for their removal and it was obvious that the Cherokees refused to leave their lands, the army prepared for a forced removal. Thus, the barracks, offices, shops, kitchens and other buildings were enlarged. During May of 1838, General Abraham Eustis took command. He had just left the Seminole War in Florida. The same month, the Cherokee removal from Georgia began. Reports of abusive treatment of prisoners caused General Winfield Scott stationed at Fort Cass to suspend operations until early June. Because the army expected violent resistance in the most densely populated regions of the Cherokees, General Scott traveled to Fort Butler to personally direct the roundup of June 12, 1838. More than 3,000 Cherokee prisoners from western North Carolina and northern Georgia passed through Fort Butler that summer en route to Fort Cass, Tennessee where they would endure a long imprisonment. The stories of the removal of the Cherokees has been spun many times. Perhaps there was a happy ending when the Dawes Commission (of 1903) decided to deed Oklahoma land to those who could prove a lineage to the Cherokees. Over 32,000 applications were received in Washington, D. C., and although it is interesting reading them, only those relatives who could discover their ancestors on previous Indian Rolls were found entitled to the land. 

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