Saturday, July 30, 2016

The Bravest Officer to Ever Draw His Sword #northcarolinapioneers #history #genealogy

The Brave General Isaac Gregory of Fairfax Hall 

By Jeannette Holland Austin Jeannette Holland Austin(profile) 

It was General Isaac Gregory, one of the bravest officers who ever drew a sword, who protected the Albemarle region from the British during the American Revolutionary War. Before the long and bloody days began and he proved his worth as a soldier, he commanded a prominent place in the public affairs of his county. His name first appeared in the Colonial Records of North Carolina during 1773 when he was elected sheriff of Pasquotank. Then, in the same year he was appointed one of the trustees of St. Martin's Chapel in Indian Town (Currituck County), a settlement whose citizens were to serve bravely in the war. After the unsuccessful attempt of General Clinton to invade North Carolina in May of 1776, no further effort to place the State under British control was made until 1780. But during the intervening years the Carolina troops had not been idle. Their valor had been proved at Brandywine, Germantown and Stony Point, and during the winter at Valley Forge 1,450 of her soldiers shared with their comrades from the other States the hunger, cold and suffering that was the portion of the army of General George Washington throughout those dreary months. The North Carolina troops aided in the brave but unsuccessful attempt to drive the British from Savannah, 5,000 of her soldiers having been sent to prevent the capture of Charleston; but the patriot forces had been unable to repulse the invaders. Savannah fell, then Charleston, and by the last of May, 1780, both Georgia and South Carolina were in the hands of the enemy, and Cornwallis was threatening to invade North Carolina. Isaac Gregory, who in May of 1779, had been promoted to the office of Brigadier-General of the Edenton District, was ordered to join General Caswell in South Carolina. As soon as he could collect his men, Gregory marched towards the Piedmont section, en route to join the army of General Caswell; and by June he was with the Brigade of General Rutherford at Yadkin's Ford in Rowan. Near this place the Tories had collected, some 800 strong; and Rutherford hoped, with the assistance of General Gregory, to crush them. But to his disappointment, no opportunity emerged because General Bryan, the Tory leader, hearing of the defeat of the Loyalists at Ramseur's Mill a few days before, crossed the Yadkin River and united with General MacArthur, whom Cornwallis had sent on to Anson County. By July 31st, Gregory, with Rutherford and his brigade, joined General Caswell at The Cheraws, just across the South Carolina border. For several weeks there was much suffering among the men on account of the lack of food. Although corn was plentiful, the rivers were so high that the mills could not grind the meal. Meanwhile, the army of Lord Rawdon was stationed near Camden, South Carolina, and General Gates, who had joined Caswell on August 17th after having learned that the British general was daily expecting a supply of food and stores for his men, determined to intercept the convoy and capture the supplies for his own army. In the meantime Cornwallis, unknown to Gates, had joined Lord Rawdon. Gates, ignorant of this reinforcement of the troops of Lord Cornwallis, marched leisurely towards Camden to capture the coveted stores. The result of the historically wasted battle which followed is known only too well. The American militia, panic-stricken at the furious onslaught of the enemy, threw down their arms and fled and General Gates, after a vain attempt to rally his troops, lost courage and abandoned his forces and stores as well. As a result General Gates brought the everlasting disgrace upon his name which is remembered unto this generation. The cowardly conduct of Gates and several of the other officers of the American army, as well as many of the militia in this disastrous battle, was offset by the heroism and courage of others; and among those who won undying fame on that fatal field, was General Gregory. Roger Lamb, a British officer, penned an account of the battle, and speaking of the disgraceful conduct of those officers and men whose flight from the field brought shame upon the American army, said: "In justice to North Carolina, it should be remarked that General Gregory's brigade acquitted themselves well. They formed on the left of the Continentals, and kept the field while they had a cartridge left. Gregory himself was twice wounded by bayonets in bringing off his men, and many in his brigade had only bayonet wounds." Hand to hand with bayonets requires far more courage than to stand at a distance firing a musket. In the midst of the heated battle, the horse of General Gregory was shot out from under him. When Lord Cornwallis saw him fall, he was certain the General Gregory was slain that he wrote the name of Gregory in his official report of the battle, for those American officers killed on the field. Afterwards, Gregory bravely fought many more battles. 

Fairfax Plantation

After the war, he represented Camden County in the State Senate from 1778 to 1789. And in 1789 when the Currituck Seminary was established at Indian Town, Isaac Gregory and his friend and brother officer, Colonel Peter Dauge, were appointed on the board of trustees of this school, which for many years was one of the leading educational institutions of the Albemarle section. General Gregory lived at the Ferebee place in Camden County in a large brick house, known then, as now, as Fairfax Hall. Source: In Ancient Albemarle by Catherine Albertson (published by the North Carolina Society Daughters of the Revolution. 

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Friday, July 29, 2016

The Fieldpiece was used at the Battle of Guilford Court House #history #genealogy #northcarolinapioneers

The Fieldpiece at the Battle of Guilford Court House 
By Jeannette Holland Austin

American 6-pounder FieldpieceAmerican 6 Pounder Fieldpiece. At the outbreak of the War of Independence, American artillery was an accumulation of guns, mortars and howitzers of every sort and some thirteen different calibers. Since the source of importation was cut off, the undeveloped casting industries of the Colonies undertook cannon founding, and by 1775 the foundries of Philadelphia were casting both bronze and iron guns. A number of bronze French guns were brought in later. The mobile guns employed by the army of General Washington ranged from 3 to 24 pounders, with 5-1/2 and 8-inch howitzers. A few iron siege guns of 18, 24, and 32-pounder caliber were on hand, however most guns were made of bronze. The guns used round shot, grape and case shot; mortars and howitzers fired bombs and carcasses. "Side boxes" on each side of the carriage held 21 rounds of ammunition and were taken off when the piece was brought into battery. Horses or oxen, with hired civilian drivers, formed the transport. On the battlefield the cannoneers manned drag ropes to maneuver the guns into position. Sometimes, as at Guilford Courthouse, the dense forest diminished the effectiveness of artillery, but nevertheless the arm was often put to good use.   Genealogy Records to Helo you Find your North Carolina Ancestors

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Thursday, July 28, 2016

Images of Henderson Co. NC Wills & Estates #genealogy #northcarolinapioneers

North Carolina Pioneers

Henderson County Wills and Estates 1841 to 1886



Henderson County was formed in 1838 from the southern part of Buncombe County, however, during 1855 parts of Henderson and Rutherford Counties were combined to form Polk County, and in 1861 parts of Henderson County and Jackson County were combined to form Transylvania County. It was named after Leonard Henderson the Chief Justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court from 1829 to 1833.

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Henderson CountyHendersonville
Images of Henderson County Wills 1841 to 1886 - J to Z available to members ofNorth Carolina Pioneers

  • Jimison, James
  • Johnson, Hugh
  • Jones, Joshua
  • King, MacMillane
  • King, Mitchell
  • Lasdson, Mary F.
  • Lance, Jerusha
  • Lance, Samuel
  • Lanning, Margaret
  • Lyda, Jacob
  • Mabin, John
  • Mabin, Mathew
  • Maxwell, James
  • Maybin, George V.
  • Maybin, Matthew
  • McClain, John
  • McClain, Mira A. C.
  • Merrill, William
  • Miller, David B.
  • Myers, David
  • Molyneux, Edmund
  • Molyneaux, Eliza Harriett
  • Norris, John
  • Orr, John
  • Owenby, Ambrose
  • Pace, Daniel
  • Pinkney, C. C.
  • Rhodes, Hannah
  • Ripley, Valentine
  • Roberts, James
  • Shipman, Edward
  • Summey, Jacob
  • Townsend, Robert Russell
  • Whitmire, Christopher
  • Wilson, Benjamin
  • Wilson, William
Images of Henderson County Wills 1841 to 1886 - A to H available to members of North Carolina Pioneers

  • Alexander, Mariah
  • Allen, George
  • Ballard, R. H.
  • Baring, Charles
  • Baring, Susan
  • Bennett, Jane M.
  • Blake, Daniel
  • Bowen, Nelson
  • Bryson, William
  • Cagle, John
  • Carson, John C.
  • Caruth, Mary
  • Case, E. F.
  • Colquhoun, John
  • Corn, John P.
  • Crawford, James
  • Duval, James W.
  • Edney, Asa
  • Erwin, Thomas
  • Evans, Joseph
  • Featherston, Ambrose M.
  • Featherston, Merrimon
  • Fletcher, Susan
  • Freeman, Meredith
  • Gash, Leanders
  • Gillaspie, Mary
  • Gillaspie, William
  • Hanckle, Christian
  • Henry, William B.
  • Herring, Lewis W.
  • Hightower, Epaphroditus
  • Hill, Robert
  • Hodges, John
  • Hoots, Joseph
  • Humble, Mary D.

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Wednesday, July 27, 2016

Fort Fisher, a Confederate Earthenworks Fort #genealogy #history #northcarolinapioneers

Fort Fisher near Wilmington
By Jeannette Holland Austin

Fort Fisher

Fort Fisher near Wilmington possessed one of the largest Confederate earthenworks forts, with Colonel William Lamb as its commander. In fact, it was Lamb who redesigned the fort similar to the Russian Crimean War fort called Malakoff Tower. It was heavily armed and its earth and sand mound construction readily absorbed bombardment by heavy artillery. In December of 1864, the Union Navy blew up a ship packed with explosive in front of the fort, with slight damage to the fort itself. Determined to close the port of Wilmington to Confederate blockade runners, General Grant ordered a second attack in January of 1865. During Jnuary of 1865 Confederate defenders repelled one part of the Union attack on Fort Fisher. However, when Federal units penetracted the defenses of the fort in another sector, they captured the fort. The fall of Fort Fisher closed the part of Wilmington, which was the last fort open to the Confederacy.

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Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Historical Palmer-Marsh House in Bath, NC #history #genealogy #northcarolinapioneers

The Palmer-Marsh House in Bath

Palmer-Marsh HouseThe Georgian two-story frame house was constructed ca 1744. It was the residence of Colonel Robert Palmer, a surveyor and later customs officer in Bath. It has the unusual feature of a double brick chimney seventeen feet wide at its base and four feet thick, with two windows in the brick wall between the flues. 

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Monday, July 25, 2016

The Hope Plantation in Bertie Co. NC #history #northcarolinapioneers.com

Hope Plantation in Bertie County
By Jeannette Holland Austin

Hope PlantationThe Hope Plantation was built by David Stone, a congressman, senator and twice governor of North Carolina around 1803. The two-story frame house features a pedimented portico and the 1763 gambrel roof of the King-Bazemore House, built by William King, a Bertie County planter. Pictured is the hall of Hope Plantation which was used as a summer living area. Find your North Carolina Ancestors 

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County Records of 8 Genealogy Websites

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Georgia
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Virginia
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Sunday, July 24, 2016

Images of Buncombe Co. NC Wills and Estates #genealogy #northcarolinapioneers.com

Buncombe County Wills and Estates

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Asheville, North Carolina

Buncombe county was formed in 1791 from parts of Burke County and Rutherford Counties. It was named for Edward Buncombe, a colonel in the American Revolutionary War, who was captured at the Battle of Germantown. The large county originally extended to the Tennessee line. Many of the settlers were Baptists, and in 1807 the pastors of six churches including the revivalist Sion Blythe formed the French Broad Association of Baptist churches in the area. In 1808 the western part of Buncombe County became Haywood County. In 1833 parts of Burke County and Buncombe County were combined to form Yancey County, and in 1838 the southern part of what was left of Buncombe County became Henderson County. In 1851 parts of Buncombe County and Yancey County were combined to form Madison County. Finally, in 1925 the Broad River township of McDowell County was transferred to Buncombe County.

Genealogy Records available to members of North Carolina Pioneers

Images of Will Book B, 1869 to 1899 Names of Testators:
    | Alexander, George C. | Allen, Autonia | Baird, Eliza T. | Baird, Mary A. | Banks, H. H. | Banks, S. M. | Bell, Thomas | Brand, Hann | Brank, Joseph R. | Brittain, George W. | Brittain, William | Brookshire, Lula | Brown, Nathan | Brown, Nathaniel | Brown, William H. | Buchanan, W. A. | Burnett, Elrige | Burnett, James M. | Burnham, Hiram | Buttam, William | Calloway, Sarah Ann | Carter, Daniel W. | Chambers, William | Chambers, William Sr. | Chunn, Joseph | Clark, Jesse | Cochran, Harriet | Cole, Joel | Coleman, William | Conley, John | Crane, Mary Ann | Cunningham, E. H. | Cunningham, John W. | Curtis, B. J. | Daugherty, Lemuel | Davis, Asbery | DeBrull, Susanna | Duffield, Charles | Dula, Thomas | Edney, James M. | Edwards, Helen Maria | Eller, Adam | Eller, William | Embles, Joseph | Endley, James | Erwin, William A. | Frank, John | Freer, Carolina | Frisbee, William | Garren, Marion | Green, Jeremiah | Green, Katherine | Hall, A. E. | Hampton, Levi | Hawley, Levi | Henderson, David | Henderson, L. D. | Henry, James L. | Herndon, E. W. | Herrick, Edwin Hayden | Hyatt, P. A. | Hyman, Ellen | Ingram, Louis | James, Silas | Johnson, A. R. | Johnson, Henry J. | Johnson, Rufus | Johnson, V. D. | Johnston, Hugh J. | Jump, William | Kennedy, John P. | Kimberley, Bettie | Lanning, John | Lanning, Rebecca | Lee, Stephen | Lenoir, Betsy | Litcomb, Margarett | Love, Lorenzo | Luther, Laura | Luther, Solomon | Lynch, Martha J. | McBrayer, William | McGill, Wardlaw | Mercer, Sarah Ann | Merrell, John | Merriman, Branch H. | Middleton, Henry | Miles, Levin | Miller, Henry | Miller, Peter | Moody, Mary Janet | Mordecai, G. W. | Morgan, David | Morgan, Noah | Morrow, Ebenezer | Murdock, Margaret | Murphy, Laura | Murray, Patience Marcella | Murray, Robert A. | Murray, William S. | Palmer, C. B. | Patton, Eliza W. | Patton, John E. | Penland, M. P. | Pinner, Hugh | Plummer, William G. | Polk, Thomas | Poor, John | Pullium, R. W. | Randolph, Mary | Rankin, W. D. | Ratcliff, M. J. | Reed, Jacob | Reed, William R. | Revis, W. C. | Reynolds, John | Reynolds, John D. | Richards, Charles B. | Roberson, James Alford | Roberts, James Riley | Roberts, Joshua | Roberts, M. | Roberts, Thomas O. | Rogers, Caroline M. | Roselee, Sarah | Rumple, Robert | Russell, W. H. | Saunders, Benjamin F. | Shackleford, P. C. | Sluder, J. E. | Sluder, John | Southee, Joseph | Smith, B. J. | Smith, F. A., Mrs. | Smith, James T. | Smith, J. H. | Smith, Owen | Smith, William A. | Stepp, Rachael | Stevens, Francis M. | Stevenson, Abraham | Stewart, John Curtice | Stroup, Nancy | Swain, Eleanor H. | Taylor, Robert J. | Wallack, Isadore | Weaver, Jesse R. | Weaver, John S. | Weaver, M. M. | Wells, J. R. | Whitaker, Henry | White, David | Woodcocke, J. A. | Woodfin, Eliza | Worth, Frederick | Young, Lewis
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Images of Buncombe County Will Book C, 1887 to 1897 Names of Testators:
    | Adams, Daniel D. | Adams, Julia W. | Alexander, George Newton | Arnold, Henry | Ashworth, Johnson | Austin, J. H. | Baird, Rebecca | Ballard, Caroline | Barker, Clarence Johnson | Blount, John Gray | Braunch, William George | Broesback, Anna | Brown, Daniel | Brown, Mary T. | Budd, Margaret Anderson | Call, John D. | Cameron, Paul | Carpenter, John | Carpenter, John (1911) | Carroll, John L. | Carter, Melvin Edmondson | Cathcart, William | Cathcart, William (1805) | Cathey, J. L. | Cawble, Jacob | Chambers, John C. | Chapman, S. F. | Chapman, Verina | Christiansen, George | Cole, Ann B. | Clark, Adger | Clemmons, E. T. | Cortland, Mary Katharine | Croft, Sarah Ann | Cummins, Anson W. | Cushman, Walter S. | D' Allinges, Baron Eugene | Davidson, Thomas F. | Dobbins, Mary | Ducket, Margaret | Frady, J. A. | Frady, John | Fulton, Mary | Garren, David | Gask, B. S. | Goodrum, Maria | Haggard, Elliott | Hendry, Theodore | Henry, Robert | Hill, Wylie | Hines, W. F. | Israel, Levina | Johnson, Julius | Johnston, Andrew H. | Johnston, William | Jones, R. L. F. | Lagle, W. S. | Lindsey, Andrew J. | Mason, Lavinia | McHemphill, William | McMerrill, John | McNeal, Florella | McRee, C. E. | Melke, Arthur | Meyers, Sarah Ellick | Meyers, Sarah Thayer | Miller, George | Miller, Joseph M. | Moore, Harry V. | Murdock, David | Murray, J. L. | Neilson, M. A. | Peller, Joseph | Penland, William M. | Pinketon, James | Pinner, Leander | Powell, Martha J. | Price, Linus | Randall, James M. | Randall, Matthew | Reed, John Sr. | Reeves, John | Reynolds, Alice | Roberts, J. R. | Schultz, Andrew | Spivey, B. F. | Starnes, Jacob | Summer, Richard | Swain, Eleanor H. | Tagg, Marcellus J. | Tennent, Charles | Tennent, Marianne | Tompkins, Frederick W. | Washington, Julia | Weaver, M. M. | Webb, S. W. | Weber, August | West, George W. | Whitaker, L. W. | White, Edward S. | Wilson, Alfred
Images of Will Book A, 1831 to 1868 Names of Testators:
    | Alexander, James | Alexander, James C. | Alexander, Lorenzo D. | Anderson, William | Arrington, James | Ashby, John | Ayres, C. | Baird, B. | Baird, Hannah | Ball, Joel | Bell, Thomas | Boyd, James | Brevard, John | Burlison, Edward | Call, John | Candler, Zachariah | Carter, Jesse | Carver, Joseph | Chambers, John | Cochran, Harriett | Cochran, William | Cole, Jesse | Cole, Joseph | Collins, Riddick | Cooke, Joseph | Curtis, Benjamin | Curtis, Delilah | Dale, Richard | Davidson, Samuel | Davidson, Sophronia | Davis, John | Davis, Margarett | Davis, William | Dillingham, Absalom | Dilliingham, Rebecca | Dougherty, John | Doweese, Garrett | Edmons, Elizabeth | Edwards, David | Edwards, Isham | Eller, Mary | Flagg, William | Fortner, John | Foster, Mary | Foster, Thomas | Foster, Thomas | Garmon, William | Gaston, Thomas | Gentry, John | Gilbert, Daniel | Gill, Rebecca | Gillispie, Francis | Goodlake, Thomas | Gousley, Hugh | Grantham, Joseph | Green, Jeremiah | Gudger, William | Harper, Lot | Harris, Able | Hawkins, Rachel | Henry, Dorcas | Holcombe, Obediah | Hutsell, Elizabeth | Ingle, Elizabeth | Ingram, Thomas | James, Thomas | Jarrett. Fanny | Johnston, A. H. | Jones, Ebed | Jones, George W. | Jones, Thomas | Jones, Wiley | Jones, William | Killian, William | King, Jonathan | Lackey, John | Lane, Sarah Ann | Livingston, John | Low, Stephen | Lowrey, James | Lusk, John | Marson, William | Martin, Jacob | McBrayer, James | McDonnell, William | McDowel, Athan | McFee, John | Means, John | Merrell, Benjamin | Merrell, Jesse | Merrell, John | Morgan, James | Morrison, John | Murdock, William | Nelson, William | Owens, John | Palmer, Jesse | Palmer, J. T. | Patton, Ann | Patton, James A. | Patton, James | Patton, James W. | Patton, John | Peavy, Bartlett | Peek, Jesse | Penland, John | Pinner, Burrell | Pitman, Thomas | Plemans, Peter | Poor, Isaac | Porter, Edmund | Porter, William | Potter, James | Powers, Brady | Prestwood, Johnathan | Reaves, Malachi | Reed, Eldred | Reed, Jane | Reed, Peter | Reynolds, Joseph | Roberts, John | Robeson, Andrew | Robeson, Jonah | Robeson, William | Robird, Robert | Rogers, Andrew | Saddler, John Roberd | Saunders, Benjamin | Sharp, Thomas | Smith, James M. | Smith, James M. (1864) | Spier, Alexander | Stepp, Silas | Stockton, Richard | Summers, Richard | Thrash, Valentine | Turner, James | Vance, Priscilla | Warren, Robert | Weaver, J. T. | Wells, Leander | Wells, Thomas | West, Henry | West, John | Whitaker, John | Whitaker, William | White, Ann | Whitesides, John B. | Whitmire, Christopher | Williamson, Elijah | Williamson, Elizabeth | Williamson, Richard | Willis, John | Wilson, John | Woodfin, J. W. | Wyatt, Shadrack | Young, John | Young, Rosannah | Young, Sarah
Indexes to Probate Records
  • Wills 1831 to 1868; Wills 1868 to 1899; Wills 1887 to 1897

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County Records of 8 Genealogy Websites

Alabama
Georgia
Kentucky
North Carolina
Virginia
South Carolina
Tennessee



Bundle and Save BUNDLE RATE for 8. Access to all eight websites plus additional data in other States: Bibles, genealogies, civil war records, colonial records, marriages, wills, estates, special collections, books written by renowned Georgia genealogist Jeannette Holland Austin.

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